Australian Dawn

Grampians – Brambuk Dawn in Australia

Hi I’m JM and this is the pulse of the planet, the first episode in our new expanded format. One of the advantages of having a longer program is that we can let the sounds breath a bit. If you were going to ask me what my favorite soundscape of all time would be, I think I’d choose this one. A dawn chorus recorded in Australia in 2006 at Grampians National Park, west of Melbourne. The aboriginal or First Australian name for the park is Brambuk and it was one of the first parks in Australia administered by Indigenous Peoples. Standing in a meadow near a grove of trees, as I was making this recording, a group of curious kangaroos came by to check me out. They didn’t make any sounds, but it was a little surreal to be surrounded by them.
Most of us, including me, are not used to listening to pure sound for extended periods of time. Music yes, but not soundscapes. Can we try as an experiment to push the envelope a little? Just a few minutes of a very rich tapestry of bird song. See what captures your attention and when you tune out, if you do. One thing to listen for, at about 45 seconds into the recording, listen for a bird’s flyby – it’s a beautiful moment. Here we go..
Did you hear the fly by? Well, if you missed it …(repeats)
It’s the changes that seem to grab my attention, as if a different part of the orchestra was joining in. I’d be interested in hearing what your experience is when listening to soundscapes like this. At the end of the program, I’ll give you the best way to reach me.
Now, while I was at Brambuk, and again, this was in 2006, I spoke with Alan Burns, the Cultural Heritage Protection Officer, to get a sense of the importance of this place. At that time, Australia, like the US, was still on the road to reconciling with its indigenous population, which has a long tradition of a multilayered relationship with the environment. Here’s an excerpt from that interview.

There’s much more than can be said about the relationship between people and the environment, the organic feedback loop that we’re part of, but that will wait for future programs. In the meantime, if you want to participate in our little feedback loop, send in any questions or comments of your experiences in listening by clicking on the contact link on our website, pulseplanet.com.
My thanks to Alan Burns and the staff at the Brambuk Cultural Center in Australia. In upcoming episodes, we’re going to be featuring the work of some of the finest sound recordists in the world, with stories and amazing sounds from Arctic, the Amazon and places closer to home. Till then, I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

Australian Dawn

Headphones on as we launch our new expanded format with a favorite recording, dawn at Grampians National Park in Australia, a beautiful soundscape, plus and interview with the Cultural Heritage Officer at Grampians (Brambuk) National Park in Australia. We welcome your questions and insights at pulse@igc.org or via the contact link at pulseplanet.com.
Air Date:06/06/2022
Scientist:
Transcript:

Grampians – Brambuk Dawn in Australia Hi I'm JM and this is the pulse of the planet, the first episode in our new expanded format. One of the advantages of having a longer program is that we can let the sounds breath a bit. If you were going to ask me what my favorite soundscape of all time would be, I think I'd choose this one. A dawn chorus recorded in Australia in 2006 at Grampians National Park, west of Melbourne. The aboriginal or First Australian name for the park is Brambuk and it was one of the first parks in Australia administered by Indigenous Peoples. Standing in a meadow near a grove of trees, as I was making this recording, a group of curious kangaroos came by to check me out. They didn't make any sounds, but it was a little surreal to be surrounded by them. Most of us, including me, are not used to listening to pure sound for extended periods of time. Music yes, but not soundscapes. Can we try as an experiment to push the envelope a little? Just a few minutes of a very rich tapestry of bird song. See what captures your attention and when you tune out, if you do. One thing to listen for, at about 45 seconds into the recording, listen for a bird's flyby – it's a beautiful moment. Here we go.. Did you hear the fly by? Well, if you missed it …(repeats) It's the changes that seem to grab my attention, as if a different part of the orchestra was joining in. I'd be interested in hearing what your experience is when listening to soundscapes like this. At the end of the program, I'll give you the best way to reach me. Now, while I was at Brambuk, and again, this was in 2006, I spoke with Alan Burns, the Cultural Heritage Protection Officer, to get a sense of the importance of this place. At that time, Australia, like the US, was still on the road to reconciling with its indigenous population, which has a long tradition of a multilayered relationship with the environment. Here's an excerpt from that interview. There's much more than can be said about the relationship between people and the environment, the organic feedback loop that we're part of, but that will wait for future programs. In the meantime, if you want to participate in our little feedback loop, send in any questions or comments of your experiences in listening by clicking on the contact link on our website, pulseplanet.com. My thanks to Alan Burns and the staff at the Brambuk Cultural Center in Australia. In upcoming episodes, we're going to be featuring the work of some of the finest sound recordists in the world, with stories and amazing sounds from Arctic, the Amazon and places closer to home. Till then, I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.