Tracking Cats – Protection

Tracking Cats – Protection

Ambience: Tiger roar
Tigers and other big cats are endangered around the world, and scientists are searching for ways to protect them. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

Kelly: There is a big push now to increase the number of tigers across the world.

Marcella Kelly is a professor in the Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation at Virginia Tech.

Kelly: One thing we do need to understand is how well cats are doing outside of protected areas. Right now it doesn’t seem like there are enough protected areas to protect wild cats into perpetuity, but they can do well outside of protected areas. We just don’t know under what circumstances. For example, a couple of the areas that I’m working on in Belize are sustainably logged areas and I’m moving into studying animals in production forests. Our preliminary reports are showing that they are doing very well in those areas as long as the borders are controlled or patrolled. And actually in some instances they are doing better because the timber companies don’t want poachers in there to steal timber either, so they are protecting their borders pretty well.
Then ultimately the other question we need to address is how to deal with human wildlife conflict? When large cats come out of the forest and, for example, kill livestock, are there things that we can do to ameliorate that problem? Are there changes in livestock ranching practices? Are there deterrents that we can keep cats out of these areas?
A lot of ranchers might have there ranches butt up right to a forest edge, which can be a very dangerous area for livestock. So maybe changing some of those ranching practices which requires some shifts in maybe culturally the way people do ranching is one possibility. Another way is going back to dogs again. Other areas are using large dogs to protect livestock, Great Pyrenees or other types of large livestock-protecting animals.

I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

Tracking Cats - Protection

New strategies for saving tigers and other big cats around the world.
Air Date:03/28/2017
Scientist:
Transcript:

Tracking Cats - Protection

Ambience: Tiger roar
Tigers and other big cats are endangered around the world, and scientists are searching for ways to protect them. I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

Kelly: There is a big push now to increase the number of tigers across the world.

Marcella Kelly is a professor in the Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation at Virginia Tech.

Kelly: One thing we do need to understand is how well cats are doing outside of protected areas. Right now it doesn't seem like there are enough protected areas to protect wild cats into perpetuity, but they can do well outside of protected areas. We just don't know under what circumstances. For example, a couple of the areas that I'm working on in Belize are sustainably logged areas and I'm moving into studying animals in production forests. Our preliminary reports are showing that they are doing very well in those areas as long as the borders are controlled or patrolled. And actually in some instances they are doing better because the timber companies don't want poachers in there to steal timber either, so they are protecting their borders pretty well.
Then ultimately the other question we need to address is how to deal with human wildlife conflict? When large cats come out of the forest and, for example, kill livestock, are there things that we can do to ameliorate that problem? Are there changes in livestock ranching practices? Are there deterrents that we can keep cats out of these areas?
A lot of ranchers might have there ranches butt up right to a forest edge, which can be a very dangerous area for livestock. So maybe changing some of those ranching practices which requires some shifts in maybe culturally the way people do ranching is one possibility. Another way is going back to dogs again. Other areas are using large dogs to protect livestock, Great Pyrenees or other types of large livestock-protecting animals.

I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.