Emerald Ash Borer – Invasive Marauder

EAB Devastating Losses

One species of insect is single-handedly wiping out entire forests of ash trees. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

Rosenthal: An emerald ash borer is a small beetle. It’s about half an inch long. It’s metallic emerald in color, and they’re quite hard to see, because they tend to first occur very high up in the canopies of trees.

Biologist Jonathan Rosenthal is with the Ecological Research Institute in Kingston, NY.

Rosenthal: Research has shown that is present since the 1990s in the Detroit area and it spread like wildfire fire since then. It now effects ash trees in 27 of the states. So the emerald ash borer came from Asia . It arrived almost certainly on what’s known as solid wood packing material — things like pallets, that are used to ship items worldwide. And in fact the solid wood packing material is a major problem in importing other invasive forest pests.

Like many other of our invasive species, the Emerald Ash Borer or EAB has no major natural predators in the United States.

Rosenthal: The mortality from EAB is close to 100%. What EAB is likely to do is to render ash functionally extinct throughout much of its range in North America. Millions of trees have been killed by emerald ash borer. In areas that have already been long invaded – Michigan, Ohio – that part of the country, there are just massive tracts of forest where ash has essentially been rendered extinct.

We’ll hear more about the Emerald Ash Borer in future programs. Pulse of the Planet is made possible in part by VirginiaTech, inventing the future through a hands-on approach to education and research.

Emerald Ash Borer - Invasive Marauder

One species of insect is single-handedly wiping out entire forests of ash trees.
Air Date:01/12/2017
Scientist:
Transcript:

EAB Devastating Losses

One species of insect is single-handedly wiping out entire forests of ash trees. I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

Rosenthal: An emerald ash borer is a small beetle. It's about half an inch long. It's metallic emerald in color, and they're quite hard to see, because they tend to first occur very high up in the canopies of trees.

Biologist Jonathan Rosenthal is with the Ecological Research Institute in Kingston, NY.

Rosenthal: Research has shown that is present since the 1990s in the Detroit area and it spread like wildfire fire since then. It now effects ash trees in 27 of the states. So the emerald ash borer came from Asia . It arrived almost certainly on what's known as solid wood packing material -- things like pallets, that are used to ship items worldwide. And in fact the solid wood packing material is a major problem in importing other invasive forest pests.

Like many other of our invasive species, the Emerald Ash Borer or EAB has no major natural predators in the United States.

Rosenthal: The mortality from EAB is close to 100%. What EAB is likely to do is to render ash functionally extinct throughout much of its range in North America. Millions of trees have been killed by emerald ash borer. In areas that have already been long invaded - Michigan, Ohio - that part of the country, there are just massive tracts of forest where ash has essentially been rendered extinct.

We'll hear more about the Emerald Ash Borer in future programs. Pulse of the Planet is made possible in part by VirginiaTech, inventing the future through a hands-on approach to education and research.