Science Diary: Mohonk – Recording Nature

Science Diary: Mohonk – Recording Nature

Music

SS: “So this is the weather record for Jan 27th, 1940. The maximum temperature that day was 22 degrees Fahrenheit, the minimum was 4 degrees” [fade under]

JM: The daily weather, one of the rhythms of life on earth, and today a story of the family and place where these observations have been made and recorded every day, for generations. Welcome to Pulse of the Planet’s Science Diaries, a glimpse of the world of science from the inside.

SS: “We have 41,664 days of weather records and precipitation, which is 115 years.”

JM: That’s Shanan Smiley, carrying on a Smiley family tradition of collecting and recording local weather information every day.

SS: “They were Quakers, and they were, as they described themselves, perpetual recorders. They had this impulse to record everything. It’s very unique to have weather record and species records going back so far, all in the same spot. So we can really look back and see what kinds of things have changed over time with regard to species and climate change, too.”

JM: Paul Huth is director of research at the Mohonk Preserve in New York’s Hudson Valley, home ground for the Smiley’s record-keeping.

PH: “Today I’ll be recording as observer for the National Weather Service the 41,664th day of weather observation here at Mohonk. It’s almost like the mail must go through, we don’t miss a day. The weather box similar to this has been on the site here since the first of January, in 1896. Twenty-six degrees, and that’s the minimum temperature since yesterday. I’m spinning the maximum thermometer to reset it, but also to get the observed temperature right now, which is 32 degrees; so it’s right on freezing.”

Pulse of the Planet’s Science Diaries are made possible by the National Science Foundation. I’m Jim Metzner.

Science Diary: Mohonk - Recording Nature

The records of one family in New York's Hudson Valley are shedding light on regional weather and climate patterns.
Air Date:04/07/2010
Scientist:
Transcript:

Science Diary: Mohonk - Recording Nature

Music

SS: "So this is the weather record for Jan 27th, 1940. The maximum temperature that day was 22 degrees Fahrenheit, the minimum was 4 degrees" [fade under]

JM: The daily weather, one of the rhythms of life on earth, and today a story of the family and place where these observations have been made and recorded every day, for generations. Welcome to Pulse of the Planet's Science Diaries, a glimpse of the world of science from the inside.

SS: "We have 41,664 days of weather records and precipitation, which is 115 years."

JM: That's Shanan Smiley, carrying on a Smiley family tradition of collecting and recording local weather information every day.

SS: "They were Quakers, and they were, as they described themselves, perpetual recorders. They had this impulse to record everything. It's very unique to have weather record and species records going back so far, all in the same spot. So we can really look back and see what kinds of things have changed over time with regard to species and climate change, too."

JM: Paul Huth is director of research at the Mohonk Preserve in New York's Hudson Valley, home ground for the Smiley's record-keeping.

PH: "Today I'll be recording as observer for the National Weather Service the 41,664th day of weather observation here at Mohonk. It's almost like the mail must go through, we don't miss a day. The weather box similar to this has been on the site here since the first of January, in 1896. Twenty-six degrees, and that's the minimum temperature since yesterday. I'm spinning the maximum thermometer to reset it, but also to get the observed temperature right now, which is 32 degrees; so it's right on freezing."

Pulse of the Planet's Science Diaries are made possible by the National Science Foundation. I'm Jim Metzner.