Helicopter – Runway Independent

Music
Ambience: EC120 Helicopter taxiing away, EC120 Helicopter taxiing, EC120 Helicopter 360 turn.

If you’ve flown on a commercial airline recently, you know that the wait to land or take off from airport runways is longer than ever. And if these delays have you frustrated, there may be a solution no runways. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet. William Warmbrodt is Chief of the Aerodynamics Branch at Ames Research Center. He thinks the answer for the runway traffic jam may be helicopters

“Helicopters and other vertical-lift aircraft do not require the use of runways. They’re sometimes called runway-independent aircraft. The opportunity that we have here in the future is to be able to enable efficient vertical-lift aircraft that can carry large numbers of people from airports or from other vertical ports located in different locations to various other locations, including city centers to city centers, and unload the runways. The current capability of a helicopter would be two hundred to two hundred and fifty miles. That would allow us to fly from city center to city center say on the East Coast, but doesn’t allow us to fly from population centers that are more widely dispersed, say in the western United States. We’re currently looking at trying to build the technology that would allow us to have vertical-lift transports that could carry forty to one hundred people from, say, San Francisco to Los Angeles with aircraft that don’t require runways. That technology is likewise being pursued for smaller vehicles that could have up to, say, a thousand miles range. The opportunities are there, if we pursue the promise of new lightweight materials, advanced aerodynamic designs, improved, more efficient propulsion systems that will, in fact, enable a future generation of runway-independent aircraft.”

Pulse of the Planet is made possible by the National Science Foundation, with additional support from NASA.

Helicopter - Runway Independent

No more waiting for your plane to take off? Air travel without runways could be in our future!
Air Date:09/24/2007
Scientist:
Transcript:

Music
Ambience: EC120 Helicopter taxiing away, EC120 Helicopter taxiing, EC120 Helicopter 360 turn.

If you’ve flown on a commercial airline recently, you know that the wait to land or take off from airport runways is longer than ever. And if these delays have you frustrated, there may be a solution no runways. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet. William Warmbrodt is Chief of the Aerodynamics Branch at Ames Research Center. He thinks the answer for the runway traffic jam may be helicopters

“Helicopters and other vertical-lift aircraft do not require the use of runways. They're sometimes called runway-independent aircraft. The opportunity that we have here in the future is to be able to enable efficient vertical-lift aircraft that can carry large numbers of people from airports or from other vertical ports located in different locations to various other locations, including city centers to city centers, and unload the runways. The current capability of a helicopter would be two hundred to two hundred and fifty miles. That would allow us to fly from city center to city center say on the East Coast, but doesn't allow us to fly from population centers that are more widely dispersed, say in the western United States. We're currently looking at trying to build the technology that would allow us to have vertical-lift transports that could carry forty to one hundred people from, say, San Francisco to Los Angeles with aircraft that don't require runways. That technology is likewise being pursued for smaller vehicles that could have up to, say, a thousand miles range. The opportunities are there, if we pursue the promise of new lightweight materials, advanced aerodynamic designs, improved, more efficient propulsion systems that will, in fact, enable a future generation of runway-independent aircraft.”

Pulse of the Planet is made possible by the National Science Foundation, with additional support from NASA.