Science Diary: Healthy Ocean- Stormy Skies

Ambience: Thunderstorm

“I’ve just gotten into one of the small rubberized Zodiac boats, and we’re looking for turtles.”

Welcome to Pulse of the Planet’s Science Diaries. A glimpse of the world of science from the inside. We’re with Carl Safina, founder of the Blue Ocean Institute, a marine conservation organization. He’s been taking part in a research voyage off the western coast of Central America and he’s about to experience the unpredictability of weather on the open sea.

“There’s a long six-foot swell on the ocean. It’s very dramatic. The sky is very black, like a big purple bruise in some places, and we can hear thunder. Most of the rest of the ocean is silver with the slanting afternoon sun. It’s really quite spectacular and awesomely beautiful, but it seems as though by the minute that dark sky is overtaking us, so I guess it’s a race between the thunder and the rain and the turtles we may find.”

“Well, it’s just about five minutes later, and we’re back on the ship because that incredibly beautiful weather turned very nasty and threatening in a big hurry, and the people on the ship saw what was coming. The funny thing was that right before I went into the small boat, I looked at my camera bag, and I said, “Well, it’s not going to rain in the next hour. There’s no chance of that,” and as soon as we got in the boat, boy, it really changed quickly, and you could see the whitecaps just come up, and we felt those buffets of cold air hit us, so we came running back to the ship.”

You can check out Carl Safina’s blog on pulseplanet.com. Pulse of the Planet’s Science Diaries are made possible by the National Science Foundation. I’m Jim Metzner.

music

Science Diary: Healthy Ocean- Stormy Skies

Best to have your foul weather gear handy when you head out into the open ocean.
Air Date:04/11/2007
Scientist:
Transcript:

Ambience: Thunderstorm

"I've just gotten into one of the small rubberized Zodiac boats, and we're looking for turtles."

Welcome to Pulse of the Planet's Science Diaries. A glimpse of the world of science from the inside. We're with Carl Safina, founder of the Blue Ocean Institute, a marine conservation organization. He's been taking part in a research voyage off the western coast of Central America and he's about to experience the unpredictability of weather on the open sea.

"There's a long six-foot swell on the ocean. It's very dramatic. The sky is very black, like a big purple bruise in some places, and we can hear thunder. Most of the rest of the ocean is silver with the slanting afternoon sun. It's really quite spectacular and awesomely beautiful, but it seems as though by the minute that dark sky is overtaking us, so I guess it's a race between the thunder and the rain and the turtles we may find."

"Well, it's just about five minutes later, and we're back on the ship because that incredibly beautiful weather turned very nasty and threatening in a big hurry, and the people on the ship saw what was coming. The funny thing was that right before I went into the small boat, I looked at my camera bag, and I said, "Well, it's not going to rain in the next hour. There's no chance of that," and as soon as we got in the boat, boy, it really changed quickly, and you could see the whitecaps just come up, and we felt those buffets of cold air hit us, so we came running back to the ship."

You can check out Carl Safina's blog on pulseplanet.com. Pulse of the Planet's Science Diaries are made possible by the National Science Foundation. I'm Jim Metzner.

music