Weeping Icon

In the spring of 1985, the monks at the Christ of the Hills Monastery in Blanco, Texas noticed what appeared to be tears streaming from the eyes of an Icon of the Virgin Mary. Since that time, the icon has continued to weep tears of myrrh. I’m Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet. The monks at the monastery do not necessarily seek a scientific explanation for the weeping icon. Father Pangratios explains how the church treats this phenomena — which is apparently common throughout the Orthodox faith…

“What the icon weeps is myrrh. We’ve never had it scientifically analyzed. Typically, among the Orthodox, we don’t do that because what happens is beyond the natural — it’s beyond the realm of scientific. The church investigates. The church wants to make sure first of all that it’s not a fake and second of all that it’s not occurring by some natural phenomenon. But once the church is satisfied that it is in fact a miracle, then that’s all that’s done. So whether chemically the substance that the icon weeps is myrrh or not, I don’t really care. What’s important to me is that God is manifesting his grace. The word for oil that is used in Greek is very similar to the word for mercy, so an oil flowing from an icon demonstrates for us the pouring forth of the mercy of God.”

Many pilgrims travel to this remote monastery in Texas’s hill country to witness the icon for themselves. The monks caution, however, that it does not weep on demand.

To hear about our new CD, please visit pulseplanet.com. Pulse of the Planet is made possible by the National Endowment for the Humanities. I’m Jim Metzner.

music

Weeping Icon

Pilgrims travel to a small monastery in Texas to witness a phenomenon.
Air Date:06/30/2003
Scientist:
Transcript:


In the spring of 1985, the monks at the Christ of the Hills Monastery in Blanco, Texas noticed what appeared to be tears streaming from the eyes of an Icon of the Virgin Mary. Since that time, the icon has continued to weep tears of myrrh. I'm Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet. The monks at the monastery do not necessarily seek a scientific explanation for the weeping icon. Father Pangratios explains how the church treats this phenomena -- which is apparently common throughout the Orthodox faith...

"What the icon weeps is myrrh. We've never had it scientifically analyzed. Typically, among the Orthodox, we don't do that because what happens is beyond the natural -- it's beyond the realm of scientific. The church investigates. The church wants to make sure first of all that it's not a fake and second of all that it's not occurring by some natural phenomenon. But once the church is satisfied that it is in fact a miracle, then that's all that's done. So whether chemically the substance that the icon weeps is myrrh or not, I don't really care. What's important to me is that God is manifesting his grace. The word for oil that is used in Greek is very similar to the word for mercy, so an oil flowing from an icon demonstrates for us the pouring forth of the mercy of God."

Many pilgrims travel to this remote monastery in Texas's hill country to witness the icon for themselves. The monks caution, however, that it does not weep on demand.

To hear about our new CD, please visit pulseplanet.com. Pulse of the Planet is made possible by the National Endowment for the Humanities. I'm Jim Metzner.

music