Memories of Migration


The change of seasons carries memories of seasons past. I’m Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet, presented by DuPont. Here’s a remembrance of bygone autumns from one of our listeners. Tom Wooden is a naturalist, teacher and sculptor who lives in New Orleans.

“At night, my windows were always open. These were my windows to the world, so to speak. When winter comes, we have a cold front will come through. The temperature will dip. And so these cold fronts push these migratory birds through our area. At night, lying in my bed, I could hear these little flocks of birds flying overhead. They would be kind of making these little lisping calls, you know, these vocalizations which are quite different than the normal calls, mating calls and territorial calls. And as they would fly overhead there would just be these little (imitates)…but I’d hTear these little guys up there. These little balls of fluff hurling through this dark sky above, you know. And I’d be bundled up in my bed and it would just, uh…I felt a real kinship with them. Their fragility. And I was feeling my mortality during these fall periods, and I never knew what these birds were. I knew the different sounds they would make, but I never knew the individual species of birds that were involved. But every year, when they’d come through, they’d be like old friends. It was a way of passing the seasons, and marking…marking a passage.”

Our thanks to listener Tom Woodin. Please visit our website at nationalgeographic.com. Pulse of the Planet is presented by DuPont, bringing you the miracles of science, with additional support provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities. I’m Jim Metzner.

Memories of Migration

A listener in New Orleans shares his memories of autumns past.
Air Date:10/13/2000
Scientist:
Transcript:


The change of seasons carries memories of seasons past. I'm Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet, presented by DuPont. Here's a remembrance of bygone autumns from one of our listeners. Tom Wooden is a naturalist, teacher and sculptor who lives in New Orleans.

"At night, my windows were always open. These were my windows to the world, so to speak. When winter comes, we have a cold front will come through. The temperature will dip. And so these cold fronts push these migratory birds through our area. At night, lying in my bed, I could hear these little flocks of birds flying overhead. They would be kind of making these little lisping calls, you know, these vocalizations which are quite different than the normal calls, mating calls and territorial calls. And as they would fly overhead there would just be these little (imitates)...but I'd hTear these little guys up there. These little balls of fluff hurling through this dark sky above, you know. And I'd be bundled up in my bed and it would just, uh...I felt a real kinship with them. Their fragility. And I was feeling my mortality during these fall periods, and I never knew what these birds were. I knew the different sounds they would make, but I never knew the individual species of birds that were involved. But every year, when they'd come through, they'd be like old friends. It was a way of passing the seasons, and marking...marking a passage."

Our thanks to listener Tom Woodin. Please visit our website at nationalgeographic.com. Pulse of the Planet is presented by DuPont, bringing you the miracles of science, with additional support provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities. I'm Jim Metzner.