BUSO: Festival

In March, people throughout the northern hemisphere begin to welcome in the spring. But in the south of Hungary, during a celebration known as the Buso Festival, some people first take a couple days to scare off winter. I’m Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet, presented by DuPont.

In addition to kissing the winter months good-bye, the Buso Festival celebrates the anniversary of a successful battle against the Turks. As the story goes sometime between the 15th and 17th century, when the Turks were occupying southern Hungary, the people of the region chased them out, using enormous wooden masks to frighten their unwanted guests. These wooden masks are still an important part of the costumes worn in the Buso festival today.

Vilmos Voit is the head of the Department of Folklore at Eotvos Lorand University in Budapest.

“In entire Hungary, this is the only custom when large wooden masks appear and the persons who participate in it they have huge heavy fur coats so they look like animals. ”

The mask-bearers are the busos. The masks are roughly three feet in diameter and have horns sticking out of them. On the night of the festival, the busos walk around the village in groups making loud and frightening noises with wooden rattles, bagpipes and drums.

The busos chase young girls around, trying to catch them. The girls, in turn, flirt with the unidentified men in costume. And then on the evening of the second day, the busos set up a large bonfire. In southern Hungary, winter has been shown the back door, and spring has begun.

Pulse of the Planet is presented by DuPont, bringing you the miracles of science, with additional support provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities. I’m Jim Metzner.

BUSO: Festival

Before celebrating the spring, some people in southern Hungary first take a couple days to scare off winter.
Air Date:03/23/2000
Scientist:
Transcript:

In March, people throughout the northern hemisphere begin to welcome in the spring. But in the south of Hungary, during a celebration known as the Buso Festival, some people first take a couple days to scare off winter. I'm Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet, presented by DuPont.

In addition to kissing the winter months good-bye, the Buso Festival celebrates the anniversary of a successful battle against the Turks. As the story goes sometime between the 15th and 17th century, when the Turks were occupying southern Hungary, the people of the region chased them out, using enormous wooden masks to frighten their unwanted guests. These wooden masks are still an important part of the costumes worn in the Buso festival today.

Vilmos Voit is the head of the Department of Folklore at Eotvos Lorand University in Budapest.

"In entire Hungary, this is the only custom when large wooden masks appear and the persons who participate in it they have huge heavy fur coats so they look like animals. "

The mask-bearers are the busos. The masks are roughly three feet in diameter and have horns sticking out of them. On the night of the festival, the busos walk around the village in groups making loud and frightening noises with wooden rattles, bagpipes and drums.

The busos chase young girls around, trying to catch them. The girls, in turn, flirt with the unidentified men in costume. And then on the evening of the second day, the busos set up a large bonfire. In southern Hungary, winter has been shown the back door, and spring has begun.

Pulse of the Planet is presented by DuPont, bringing you the miracles of science, with additional support provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities. I'm Jim Metzner.