XAVANTE-Morning

If you were an anthropologist living in a remote indian village in South America, amongst the first impressions you take in would be the sounds and rhythms of a typical day. I’m Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet, presented by DuPont.

Over the past 18 years, anthropologist Laura Graham has lived amongst the Xavante (Sha VAN-tay) people in Central Brazil.

“My favorite part of the day in Xavante was waking up in the morning. I’d be lying in my hammock and I’d hear this low rumble of voices and it was the men’s council getting under way at dawn. A very comforting sound to wake up to. Sometimes at dawn also I’d hear a lament. One of the wailing laments coming from one of the houses around the village and sometimes the elder men would break up from the men’s council and come around and sing in front of the houses. They would practice the song in the center of the village and then they’d go on a tour around the village singing the same song in front of every house. And so you hear the song in the distance and it moves closer and closer and then it’s right outside the door. Strong mens’ deep voices and then they move off on the rest of their singing path around the village. So waking up was one of my favorite times.”

We’ll hear more of the rhythms and sounds of life in a Xavante village in future programs. For pictures and previews of future programs, please visit nationalgeographic.com Pulse of the Planet is presented by DuPont, bringing you the miracles of science, with additional support provided by the National Science Foundation. I’m Jim Metzner.

XAVANTE-Morning

The Xavante people of Central Brazil greet the dawn with song.
Air Date:02/23/2000
Scientist:
Transcript:

If you were an anthropologist living in a remote indian village in South America, amongst the first impressions you take in would be the sounds and rhythms of a typical day. I'm Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet, presented by DuPont.

Over the past 18 years, anthropologist Laura Graham has lived amongst the Xavante (Sha VAN-tay) people in Central Brazil.

"My favorite part of the day in Xavante was waking up in the morning. I'd be lying in my hammock and I'd hear this low rumble of voices and it was the men's council getting under way at dawn. A very comforting sound to wake up to. Sometimes at dawn also I'd hear a lament. One of the wailing laments coming from one of the houses around the village and sometimes the elder men would break up from the men's council and come around and sing in front of the houses. They would practice the song in the center of the village and then they'd go on a tour around the village singing the same song in front of every house. And so you hear the song in the distance and it moves closer and closer and then it's right outside the door. Strong mens' deep voices and then they move off on the rest of their singing path around the village. So waking up was one of my favorite times."

We'll hear more of the rhythms and sounds of life in a Xavante village in future programs. For pictures and previews of future programs, please visit nationalgeographic.com Pulse of the Planet is presented by DuPont, bringing you the miracles of science, with additional support provided by the National Science Foundation. I'm Jim Metzner.