F.I.R.E.- The Big Picture

As we learn more about our planet– whether it’s the rainforest, the oceans, or our climate– what appears at first to be a collection of smaller, unrelated systems later emerges as a complex web of cause and effect.

I’m Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet, presented by the American Museum of Natural History.

“What is important for the planet is to understand how the atmospheric greenhouse gases affect terrestrial vegetation and how they affect the ocean and how the ocean regulates.”

Michael King is Senior Project Scientist with NASA’s Earth Observing System. Pulling together information from satellite images, cloud samples, deep sea probes and plant and ice specimens, scientists with the Earth Observing System hope to draw a broader picture of the way that Earth’s climate works.

“You have a lot of scientists naturally who have specialized in one discipline of Earth science. It could be the atmosphere, it could be ocean. Even in the ocean they could be biological oceanographers or physical oceanographers. They don’t even talk to each other. And part of the challenge and part of the thrill of this particular project is getting a combination of experts and experiences across quite a wide spectrum talking and working on some similar goals. And there’s a high degree of international participation both in the observing system and the analysis and in the validation of what we’re deriving from this experiment. And there’s a lot of opportunities to get multiple nations and multiple discipline scientists all thinking and working together and it’s actually very rewarding.”

We’d like to hear from you and the ways that you observe or track or interact with your local environment throughout the seasons of your year. Please call our toll-free number: 1-877-PULSE99.

Additional funding for Pulse of the Planet has been provided by the National Science Foundation. I’m Jim Metzner.

F.I.R.E.- The Big Picture

Studying the Earth's climate affords scientists an opportunity to come together across nationality and disciplines.
Air Date:12/30/1998
Scientist:
Transcript:

As we learn more about our planet-- whether it's the rainforest, the oceans, or our climate-- what appears at first to be a collection of smaller, unrelated systems later emerges as a complex web of cause and effect.

I'm Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet, presented by the American Museum of Natural History.

"What is important for the planet is to understand how the atmospheric greenhouse gases affect terrestrial vegetation and how they affect the ocean and how the ocean regulates."

Michael King is Senior Project Scientist with NASA's Earth Observing System. Pulling together information from satellite images, cloud samples, deep sea probes and plant and ice specimens, scientists with the Earth Observing System hope to draw a broader picture of the way that Earth's climate works.

"You have a lot of scientists naturally who have specialized in one discipline of Earth science. It could be the atmosphere, it could be ocean. Even in the ocean they could be biological oceanographers or physical oceanographers. They don't even talk to each other. And part of the challenge and part of the thrill of this particular project is getting a combination of experts and experiences across quite a wide spectrum talking and working on some similar goals. And there's a high degree of international participation both in the observing system and the analysis and in the validation of what we're deriving from this experiment. And there's a lot of opportunities to get multiple nations and multiple discipline scientists all thinking and working together and it's actually very rewarding."

We'd like to hear from you and the ways that you observe or track or interact with your local environment throughout the seasons of your year. Please call our toll-free number: 1-877-PULSE99.

Additional funding for Pulse of the Planet has been provided by the National Science Foundation. I'm Jim Metzner.