SETI- Why Believe in ET’s ?

The sound we’re listening to was produced by a radio transmitter here on Earth. but it’s the sort of signal that one day might come from somewhere else in the universe, telling us that we’re not alone. I’m Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet, presented by the American Museum of Natural History.

“We live on an inconsequential planet, orbiting a rather ordinary yellow dwarf sun. Ours is one of about 400 billion stars in the Milky way galaxy. There are about a hundred billion other galaxies.”

Paul Shuch is the Director of the SETI league. SETI stands for the Search for Extra- Terrestrial Intelligence. Using sensitive receivers, SETI members listen to the radio waves which fill the universe, trying to detect patterns amongst the signals which might indicate the presence of a life form on another planet.

“We know that about 10 percent of all stars out there are kind of like our sun. Of the right size and age and temperature to have their own retinue of planets. We have already learned about how to detect planets. Just recently, we*ve seen that just about everywhere we look around certain kinds of stars, we find planets. How arrogant of us to assume that amongst all those planets, around all of those stars, that we*re the only game in town? Life forms on Earth are so diverse, that one hesitates to imagine what life might be like evolving in the light of distant suns. One thing we believe that all life in the universe, all intelligent life, would have in common, is curiosity. A desire to reach out. And if other civilizations have that desire which we have, then that will make our job all the more easier.”

Following on that desire to reach out: we’d like to hear from you and the ways that you observe or track or interact with your local environment throughout the seasons of your year. Please call our

toll-free number: 1-877-PULSE99.

Additional funding for this series has been provided by the National Science Foundation.

SETI- Why Believe in ET’s ?

How likely is it that extra-terrestrials exist?
Air Date:12/16/1998
Scientist:
Transcript:

The sound we're listening to was produced by a radio transmitter here on Earth. but it's the sort of signal that one day might come from somewhere else in the universe, telling us that we're not alone. I'm Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet, presented by the American Museum of Natural History.

"We live on an inconsequential planet, orbiting a rather ordinary yellow dwarf sun. Ours is one of about 400 billion stars in the Milky way galaxy. There are about a hundred billion other galaxies."

Paul Shuch is the Director of the SETI league. SETI stands for the Search for Extra- Terrestrial Intelligence. Using sensitive receivers, SETI members listen to the radio waves which fill the universe, trying to detect patterns amongst the signals which might indicate the presence of a life form on another planet.

"We know that about 10 percent of all stars out there are kind of like our sun. Of the right size and age and temperature to have their own retinue of planets. We have already learned about how to detect planets. Just recently, we*ve seen that just about everywhere we look around certain kinds of stars, we find planets. How arrogant of us to assume that amongst all those planets, around all of those stars, that we*re the only game in town? Life forms on Earth are so diverse, that one hesitates to imagine what life might be like evolving in the light of distant suns. One thing we believe that all life in the universe, all intelligent life, would have in common, is curiosity. A desire to reach out. And if other civilizations have that desire which we have, then that will make our job all the more easier."

Following on that desire to reach out: we'd like to hear from you and the ways that you observe or track or interact with your local environment throughout the seasons of your year. Please call our

toll-free number: 1-877-PULSE99.

Additional funding for this series has been provided by the National Science Foundation.