Earth’s Last Frontier

Heres a program from our archives.The ocean continues to be a source of mystery and fascination for people of all walks of life, in part because we know so little about it. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.ambience, Great Barrier Reef Earle: Every year we discover about 100 new species of fish, most of them from the sea, some from fresh waters that are little explored but certainly in the ocean everyone can be an explorer. It is really exciting to think that, with a mask and flippers, it’s possible to put your face in the sea and see something that no one, no human being has ever seen before.Dr. Sylvia Earle is chief scientist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The sounds we’re listening to were recorded underwater at Australia’s Great Barrier Reef.Earle: Technology is enabling us to really plan for doing some wonderful things underwater: living underwater, to go in submersibles to in due course, any depth, to have access throughout all of the planet. It is fundamental, it is necessary if we are to truly explore to truly know this place.Words of advise to a young person interested in studying oceanography: simply do it. Whether it’s being a geologist, or a chemist, or a biologist, or a poet or a writer, musician. Whatever it is, there is a place in the sea. It is after all just most of the planet. So whatever your interests are, whatever your talents are, there is a place to express that.This archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. If you want hear more, check out our podcast. Im Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

Earth's Last Frontier

In the field of oceanography, there's room for many talents and aspirations.
Air Date:11/27/2018
Scientist:
Transcript:

Heres a program from our archives.The ocean continues to be a source of mystery and fascination for people of all walks of life, in part because we know so little about it. I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.ambience, Great Barrier Reef Earle: Every year we discover about 100 new species of fish, most of them from the sea, some from fresh waters that are little explored but certainly in the ocean everyone can be an explorer. It is really exciting to think that, with a mask and flippers, it's possible to put your face in the sea and see something that no one, no human being has ever seen before.Dr. Sylvia Earle is chief scientist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The sounds we're listening to were recorded underwater at Australia's Great Barrier Reef.Earle: Technology is enabling us to really plan for doing some wonderful things underwater: living underwater, to go in submersibles to in due course, any depth, to have access throughout all of the planet. It is fundamental, it is necessary if we are to truly explore to truly know this place.Words of advise to a young person interested in studying oceanography: simply do it. Whether it's being a geologist, or a chemist, or a biologist, or a poet or a writer, musician. Whatever it is, there is a place in the sea. It is after all just most of the planet. So whatever your interests are, whatever your talents are, there is a place to express that.This archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. If you want hear more, check out our podcast. Im Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.