Geckos

Heres a program from our archives.GECKOSmusicAmbience, Gecko We’re listening to the sounds of a Tokay gecko, a lizard found in the wild and tropical areas around the world. At some pet stores, they’re being sold as a natural form of pest control. But the problems associated with keeping them, may welI outweigh the benefits. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.Bauer: The wisdom of using Tokays as a so-called, ‘natural control for cockroaches and other insects,’ is probably somewhat questionable. Aaron Bauer is an assistant professor of biology at Villanova University.Bauer: The Tokays will certainly eat the insects, but the Tokays will also run out of food relatively quickly. Cockroaches will come back, but for awhile the animals will be without food and you may have a problem maintaining them at that point. The other problem is that Tokays are very aggressive. They have a tendency to bite. They have very painful bites. They’re capable of drawing blood. They’re not dangerous in essence, they’re not venomous, but they hurt when they bite. [and] In addition to this, all those insects that the Tokay’s taking in are going to be coming out a day or so later. So you’re getting rid of cockroaches and, in return, you’re getting digested cockroaches back which may be preferable, but may be a little unsightly as well. They do have internal parasites which might be passed on to people when the animal’s feces are in contact with food or other things in the kitchen, for example. So, keeping Tokays has its ups and downs. It’s not going to be the solution to anybody’s real problems, in terms of urban insect control.This archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. If you want hear more, check out our podcast.

Geckos

You may want to think twice before recruiting Geckos for roach patrol.
Air Date:09/28/2018
Scientist:
Transcript:

Heres a program from our archives.GECKOSmusicAmbience, Gecko We're listening to the sounds of a Tokay gecko, a lizard found in the wild and tropical areas around the world. At some pet stores, they're being sold as a natural form of pest control. But the problems associated with keeping them, may welI outweigh the benefits. I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.Bauer: The wisdom of using Tokays as a so-called, 'natural control for cockroaches and other insects,' is probably somewhat questionable. Aaron Bauer is an assistant professor of biology at Villanova University.Bauer: The Tokays will certainly eat the insects, but the Tokays will also run out of food relatively quickly. Cockroaches will come back, but for awhile the animals will be without food and you may have a problem maintaining them at that point. The other problem is that Tokays are very aggressive. They have a tendency to bite. They have very painful bites. They're capable of drawing blood. They're not dangerous in essence, they're not venomous, but they hurt when they bite. [and] In addition to this, all those insects that the Tokay's taking in are going to be coming out a day or so later. So you're getting rid of cockroaches and, in return, you're getting digested cockroaches back which may be preferable, but may be a little unsightly as well. They do have internal parasites which might be passed on to people when the animal's feces are in contact with food or other things in the kitchen, for example. So, keeping Tokays has its ups and downs. It's not going to be the solution to anybody's real problems, in terms of urban insect control.This archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. If you want hear more, check out our podcast.