The Shaman’s Message

Celebrating three decades of Pulse of the Planet, here’s a program from our archives.musicFrom the heart of the Amazonian rainforest, a Brazilian shaman has a message that he wants to share with us, on behalf of the indigenous peoples of the world. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.Ambience, RainforestKinnikinau: I want all of you to think about this. That we, the Kinnikinau people exist, that the Navajo people exist, the Cheyenne people exist, the Apaches exist, the Kayap people exist, the Cabaoul, the Sheranchi, that there are indigenous peoples throughout the world, and that they must not be forgotten. Because the destiny and the survival of indigenous peoples is the key to the survival of the natural world.Kinnikinau is a shaman, a healer with an extensive knowledge of plants and herbal medicine. He lives in southeastern Brazil, in the state of Mato Grosso du Sul.Kinnikinau: As soon as you start cutting down the trees, you’re destroying the forest. Once you’ve destroyed the forest, you’ve destroyed the rivers. You destroy the rivers, and you’ve destroyed the fish. From there, you destroy the game who feed on that fish. From there, you destroy the indigenous peoples who live off that game and that fish. In the end, you end up destroying all of nature. The destruction spreads ever wider, the devastation throws a wider and wider net. The survival of my people depend upon the preservation of the forest. I want all of you to think about that, and remember that. This archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. If you want hear more, check out our podcast. Im Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

The Shaman's Message

The survival of indigenous people is linked to the survival of the natural world.
Air Date:09/20/2018
Scientist:
Transcript:

Celebrating three decades of Pulse of the Planet, here's a program from our archives.musicFrom the heart of the Amazonian rainforest, a Brazilian shaman has a message that he wants to share with us, on behalf of the indigenous peoples of the world. I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.Ambience, RainforestKinnikinau: I want all of you to think about this. That we, the Kinnikinau people exist, that the Navajo people exist, the Cheyenne people exist, the Apaches exist, the Kayap people exist, the Cabaoul, the Sheranchi, that there are indigenous peoples throughout the world, and that they must not be forgotten. Because the destiny and the survival of indigenous peoples is the key to the survival of the natural world.Kinnikinau is a shaman, a healer with an extensive knowledge of plants and herbal medicine. He lives in southeastern Brazil, in the state of Mato Grosso du Sul.Kinnikinau: As soon as you start cutting down the trees, you're destroying the forest. Once you've destroyed the forest, you've destroyed the rivers. You destroy the rivers, and you've destroyed the fish. From there, you destroy the game who feed on that fish. From there, you destroy the indigenous peoples who live off that game and that fish. In the end, you end up destroying all of nature. The destruction spreads ever wider, the devastation throws a wider and wider net. The survival of my people depend upon the preservation of the forest. I want all of you to think about that, and remember that. This archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. If you want hear more, check out our podcast. Im Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.