Saving Endangered Species

SCHALLER – Endangered SpeciesCelebrating three decades of Pulse of the Planet, here’s a program from our archives.Hardly a day goes by that we’re not hearing about some animal or plant species threatened by extinction. But if Darwin was right, and evolution is the survival of the fittest, why is it so important to save endangered species? I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.ambience, Panda vocalizations The sounds we’re listening to were made by Giant Pandas, one of the many endangered species studied by George Schaller, Director of Science at Wildlife Conservation International.Schaller: “We are now going through an extraordinary period in our history, in that we are involved in the greatest extermination of species which this world has seen in 65 million years. But that period of extermination long ago, due probably to climatic change, took about eight million years. We have a extinction spasm, as it’s called, which is a matter of a hundred years, right now, in which we’re wiping out hundreds of thousands and maybe several million species. In other words, we are wiping out the future options.””We’ve got millions of species vanishing, quietly, without anybody to mourn their passing, because they’re completely unknown. There are many people who rightly feel these creatures, who’ve been here long before humankind has been here, have also a right to exist, and we may actually need them. So you have had this century which has been one of unparalleled destructon. One hopes that the next century will be one of rehabilitation.”This archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. Im Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

Saving Endangered Species

What's the value of saving plants and animals that are threatened by extinction? This archival program is part of Pulse of the Planet's 30th anniversary celebration.
Air Date:05/22/2018
Scientist:
Transcript:

SCHALLER - Endangered SpeciesCelebrating three decades of Pulse of the Planet, here's a program from our archives.Hardly a day goes by that we're not hearing about some animal or plant species threatened by extinction. But if Darwin was right, and evolution is the survival of the fittest, why is it so important to save endangered species? I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.ambience, Panda vocalizations The sounds we're listening to were made by Giant Pandas, one of the many endangered species studied by George Schaller, Director of Science at Wildlife Conservation International.Schaller: "We are now going through an extraordinary period in our history, in that we are involved in the greatest extermination of species which this world has seen in 65 million years. But that period of extermination long ago, due probably to climatic change, took about eight million years. We have a extinction spasm, as it's called, which is a matter of a hundred years, right now, in which we're wiping out hundreds of thousands and maybe several million species. In other words, we are wiping out the future options.""We've got millions of species vanishing, quietly, without anybody to mourn their passing, because they're completely unknown. There are many people who rightly feel these creatures, who've been here long before humankind has been here, have also a right to exist, and we may actually need them. So you have had this century which has been one of unparalleled destructon. One hopes that the next century will be one of rehabilitation."This archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. Im Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.