Tree Huggers

INDIA -Tree HuggersCelebrating three decades of Pulse of the Planet, here’s a program from our archives.In Northern India, one of the critical challenges to the environment is deforestation, and the resulting soil erosion. The 1970’s saw the emergence of an environmental movement to save the trees in the foothills of the Himalayas. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.The word “Chipko” means to embrace or hug, and it was by literally hugging trees that villagers in northern India were able to stop logging companies from deforesting the region. Since the seventies, the Chipko movement has broadened to deal with many issues of environmental concern. One of the leaders is Sunderlal Bahugana (SUN-der-lal Ba-HOO-gun-a), who lives on a mountaintop overlooking a stream that will eventually form the Ganges River. The Ganges flows into the plains of India, hundreds of miles below.(Bahugana) “You know when you use more and more things, then you destroy nature. Your relationship with nature changes, and that’s the main cause of the ecological crisis today. Because modern man has become the butcher of nature. For modern man, everything in nature is a commodity. This tree’s a commodity. This is a resource. But according to our culture, this is something living, and it has a right to exist.”Our thanks to Julian Crandall-Hollick for the sounds of Northern India.This archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. Im Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

Tree Huggers

In northern India, an unusual form of direct action saved a forest and launched an environmental movement. This archival program is part of Pulse of the Planet's 30th anniversary celebration.
Air Date:05/11/2018
Scientist:
Transcript:

INDIA -Tree HuggersCelebrating three decades of Pulse of the Planet, here's a program from our archives.In Northern India, one of the critical challenges to the environment is deforestation, and the resulting soil erosion. The 1970's saw the emergence of an environmental movement to save the trees in the foothills of the Himalayas. I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.The word "Chipko" means to embrace or hug, and it was by literally hugging trees that villagers in northern India were able to stop logging companies from deforesting the region. Since the seventies, the Chipko movement has broadened to deal with many issues of environmental concern. One of the leaders is Sunderlal Bahugana (SUN-der-lal Ba-HOO-gun-a), who lives on a mountaintop overlooking a stream that will eventually form the Ganges River. The Ganges flows into the plains of India, hundreds of miles below.(Bahugana) "You know when you use more and more things, then you destroy nature. Your relationship with nature changes, and that's the main cause of the ecological crisis today. Because modern man has become the butcher of nature. For modern man, everything in nature is a commodity. This tree's a commodity. This is a resource. But according to our culture, this is something living, and it has a right to exist."Our thanks to Julian Crandall-Hollick for the sounds of Northern India.This archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. Im Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.