Honey Whistles

HUNTERS OF THE ITURI FOREST – HONEY WHISTLESmusicCelebrating three decades of Pulse of the Planet, here’s a program from our archives.We’re in the Ituri Forest of Northeastern Zaire, on a honey hunt with a group of men of the Efe People. I’m Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet.Ambience, Honey Hunt (Wilkie) “What we’re hearing is lots of the men are practicing with their Mambi, and these Mambi are honey whistles used to, I guess, cajole the bees or persuade the bees to relinquish their honey, and to notify other men, when they go out searching for honey trees, that in fact, a tree’s been found.”Anthropologist David Wilkie has spent years living with the Efe in the Ituri Forest.(Wilkie) “So, as soon as an Efe finds a honey tree he’ll blow on his Mambi, which travels quite long distances in the forest, and then the men, who are all out together looking for trees, will know that at least one tree’s been found.””It always amazes me when the Efe can find, and point out to me, a honey tree. I’m sure it’s done by hearing. They can hear the bees, and it’ll take them five minutes to explain to me where the bees are, how far up the trunk they are, where the nest is and, finally, I’ll see a bee coming out of the hole of its nest and I’ll go, ‘ Ah, that’s where it was.’ I can only do it by sight. But, the Efe clearly heard these bees from quite a distance off and were able to track down which tree the nest was in by sound, not by sight.”Ambience, Bees This archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. Im Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.David Wilkie is currently an Executive Director at the Wildlife Conservation Society.

Honey Whistles

Whistles coordinate a honey hunt in Africa's Ituri Rainforest. This archival program is part of Pulse of the Planet's 30th anniversary celebration.
Air Date:05/15/2018
Scientist:
Transcript:

HUNTERS OF THE ITURI FOREST - HONEY WHISTLESmusicCelebrating three decades of Pulse of the Planet, here's a program from our archives.We're in the Ituri Forest of Northeastern Zaire, on a honey hunt with a group of men of the Efe People. I'm Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet.Ambience, Honey Hunt (Wilkie) "What we're hearing is lots of the men are practicing with their Mambi, and these Mambi are honey whistles used to, I guess, cajole the bees or persuade the bees to relinquish their honey, and to notify other men, when they go out searching for honey trees, that in fact, a tree's been found."Anthropologist David Wilkie has spent years living with the Efe in the Ituri Forest.(Wilkie) "So, as soon as an Efe finds a honey tree he'll blow on his Mambi, which travels quite long distances in the forest, and then the men, who are all out together looking for trees, will know that at least one tree's been found.""It always amazes me when the Efe can find, and point out to me, a honey tree. I'm sure it's done by hearing. They can hear the bees, and it'll take them five minutes to explain to me where the bees are, how far up the trunk they are, where the nest is and, finally, I'll see a bee coming out of the hole of its nest and I'll go, ' Ah, that's where it was.' I can only do it by sight. But, the Efe clearly heard these bees from quite a distance off and were able to track down which tree the nest was in by sound, not by sight."Ambience, Bees This archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. Im Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.David Wilkie is currently an Executive Director at the Wildlife Conservation Society.