Carry Your Fire

HUNTERS OF THE ITURI FOREST -Lighting A FireCelebrating three decades of Pulse of the Planet, here’s a program from our archives.musicThe Ituri Forest of Northeastern Zaire is one the richest and most diverse rainforests in all of Africa. You’re listening to the first of a series of programs on the people who have lived in harmony with the Ituri for centuries. I’m Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet.Ambience, Honey Hunt We’re on a honey hunt, with a group of men of the Efe People. The Efe are hunter-gatherers, and thought to be the original inhabitants of the Ituri Forest.(Wilkie) “This is a group of six Efe men and two boys, who left camp early in the morning, and are out on their way to a honey tree that one of the men found about two weeks ago.”David Wilkie is an assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology in the University of Utah.”Some of the men will carry spears. Little boys will be carrying embers from the fires, because they don’t know how to make fire, so they have to carry burning embers with them. And maybe they don’t have to learn how to make fire because very often large canopy trees are struck by lightning, and sit on the ground smoldering for months at a time. If you think about making fire in a tropical moist forest, it makes more sense to carry your fire with you, or look for it in a lightning-struck tree, rather than waste enormous amounts of time with a fire bow or rubbing two moist sticks together.””After walking three hours following Efe to a honey tree, I would get to the honey tree and sit down, bushed, and the first thing that these guys would do is make a fire, make a honey basket, and climb sixty feet up into the tree.”musicThis archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. Im Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.David Wilkie is currently an Executive Director at the Wildlife Conservation Society.

Carry Your Fire

In the midst of a damp tropical forest, carrying a fire is easier than starting one. This archival program is part of Pulse of the Planet's 30th anniversary celebration.
Air Date:05/14/2018
Scientist:
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HUNTERS OF THE ITURI FOREST -Lighting A FireCelebrating three decades of Pulse of the Planet, here's a program from our archives.musicThe Ituri Forest of Northeastern Zaire is one the richest and most diverse rainforests in all of Africa. You're listening to the first of a series of programs on the people who have lived in harmony with the Ituri for centuries. I'm Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet.Ambience, Honey Hunt We're on a honey hunt, with a group of men of the Efe People. The Efe are hunter-gatherers, and thought to be the original inhabitants of the Ituri Forest.(Wilkie) "This is a group of six Efe men and two boys, who left camp early in the morning, and are out on their way to a honey tree that one of the men found about two weeks ago."David Wilkie is an assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology in the University of Utah."Some of the men will carry spears. Little boys will be carrying embers from the fires, because they don't know how to make fire, so they have to carry burning embers with them. And maybe they don't have to learn how to make fire because very often large canopy trees are struck by lightning, and sit on the ground smoldering for months at a time. If you think about making fire in a tropical moist forest, it makes more sense to carry your fire with you, or look for it in a lightning-struck tree, rather than waste enormous amounts of time with a fire bow or rubbing two moist sticks together.""After walking three hours following Efe to a honey tree, I would get to the honey tree and sit down, bushed, and the first thing that these guys would do is make a fire, make a honey basket, and climb sixty feet up into the tree."musicThis archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. Im Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.David Wilkie is currently an Executive Director at the Wildlife Conservation Society.