Wolf Haven

Wolf HavenCelebrating three decades of Pulse of the Planet, here’s a program from our archives.Music; Ambience: Wolf Howl JM: Man has long had a fascination for wolves, and sometimes, with the best of intentions, wolf cubs are taken from the wild and raised in captivity. But the results can be disastrous. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.SK: “The wolf is just not an animal that should be a pet. It’s a wild animal, it should stay a wild animal.”JM: Steve Kuntz runs Wolf Haven, a Washington State sanctuary for wolves that were raised in captivity.SK: “We don’t take any wolves out of the wild. The wolves that come to us all come from captive situations. These wolves would never be released to the wild mainly because they don’t know what they need to know to survive out there. Hunting is a technique, it’s taught by the parents at a very young age in the wild. It is not instinctual. If those techniques are not learned at a very young age and taught by the parents, there’ s no way that they can know that, and there’s no way that we can teach it to them. So these animals will never, never be out of captivity, it wouldn’t be fair to them. They’d end up starving to death out there. What we do with these animals that we take in is we provide a good housing situation for them where they can live as close to being what it would be out in the wild as we can possibly make it. We turn around and use them for ambassadors for the wolf in the wild, letting people see what a real wolf looks like. Many, many people don’t know what a real wolf looks like.”This archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. Im Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

Wolf Haven

A home for wolves that have been raised in captivity.This archival program (our first!) is part of Pulse of the Planet's 30th anniversary celebration.
Air Date:05/07/2018
Scientist:
Transcript:

Wolf HavenCelebrating three decades of Pulse of the Planet, here's a program from our archives.Music; Ambience: Wolf Howl JM: Man has long had a fascination for wolves, and sometimes, with the best of intentions, wolf cubs are taken from the wild and raised in captivity. But the results can be disastrous. I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.SK: "The wolf is just not an animal that should be a pet. It's a wild animal, it should stay a wild animal."JM: Steve Kuntz runs Wolf Haven, a Washington State sanctuary for wolves that were raised in captivity.SK: "We don't take any wolves out of the wild. The wolves that come to us all come from captive situations. These wolves would never be released to the wild mainly because they don't know what they need to know to survive out there. Hunting is a technique, it's taught by the parents at a very young age in the wild. It is not instinctual. If those techniques are not learned at a very young age and taught by the parents, there' s no way that they can know that, and there's no way that we can teach it to them. So these animals will never, never be out of captivity, it wouldn't be fair to them. They'd end up starving to death out there. What we do with these animals that we take in is we provide a good housing situation for them where they can live as close to being what it would be out in the wild as we can possibly make it. We turn around and use them for ambassadors for the wolf in the wild, letting people see what a real wolf looks like. Many, many people don't know what a real wolf looks like."This archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. Im Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.